Young & Thompson

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some answers to questions that we often receive.

Q: [When prosecuting a patent application and an examiner interview is desired, is it preferable to seek a telphonic or in person interview?]
A: [We have found that both of these options can be quite helpful in progressing the prosecution of a case.  In many cases, we have found in person interviews to be particularly useful as they give more of an opportunity to walk an examiner through the nuances of a case and to better gauge an examiner's receptiveness to certain aguments.  Additionally, due to the very close proximity of our office to the USPTO, we are able to offer in perosn examiner interviews as a cost effective tool in patent prosectution strategies.]


Q: [Many patents in the US take several years to issue after an application has been filed.  What, if any, options are there to have my patent issue faster?]
A: [The USPTO offers a number of different programs that can result in expidited examination of patent applications which can lead to faster issuing patents.  Some of these programs include, Track I examination, the expidited examination program, and the patent prossectution highway program.  Feel free to contact us to see if any of these options are appropriate or available for you.]


Q: [I've heard that certain goverment fees charged by the USPTO are reduced for small entities.  What are the requirements for qualifying for small entity status?]
A: [Generally, to qualify for small entity status, the owner of the patent rights must be: (i) a person who has not assigned or licensed (or is under an obligation to do so) any rights to the invention, unless the entity receiving such rights would otherwise qualify for small entity status; (ii) a small business whose number of employees or other affiliates does not exceed 500 individutals; or (iii) a non profit organization that meets certain qualifying chriteria.]

 

Frequently Asked Questions

For questions not appearing on this list, please email us here.